Anna Jones’s recipes for carrot marmalade and a vegetarian roast | Food

My family is made up of three vegetarians, two vegans, a pescatarian and Dad, who has a steak on special occasions. We’ve had to reinvent our classics to fit the tapestry of how we all eat. Our Saturday-morning pancakes are now vegan, made with oats and bananas; our favourite pudding, banoffee pie, is now topped with whipped coconut cream. It’s all part of our family’s evolution and I think it’s how more and more people eat. Family meals should be democratic; where no one is left out, so bit by bit I am updating our family classics to fit.

Seeded yorkshire puddings with rainbow veg (pictured above)

This is a summer take on a roast dinner, or even a toad-in-the-hole. It uses my go-to yorkshire pudding recipe, studded with seeds. I’m still working on a vegan version.

Prep 10 min
Cook 45 min
Makes 12

For the vegetables
2 red onions, peeled and cut into wedges
400g small or cherry tomatoes
Olive oil
Salt and black pepper
1 handful basil
200g green beans

For the yorkshire puddings
200g plain white flour
2 tbsp poppy seeds
2 tbsp toasted sesame seeds
1 heaped tsp wholegrain mustard
Salt and black pepper
4 eggs
250ml milk, topped up to 300ml with cold water
12 tsp rapeseed oil or groundnut oil

Heat the oven to 180C/350F/gas 4. Put the onions and tomatoes into a sturdy roasting tray, drizzle well with olive oil, season, tear over the basil, then put into the oven for 30 minutes, until the tomatoes are burnished and the onions soft.

For the yorkshire puddings, mix the flour, seeds, mustard, one teaspoon of salt and a good grinding of pepper in a bowl. Crack the eggs in, pour in a little of the milk mixture, and beat smooth. Continue adding the rest of the milk, bit by bit, until you have a smooth batter the consistency of double cream, then leave to rest for at least 15 minutes.

Once the tomatoes and onions are ready, add the green beans to the tray, roast for a further five minutes, then take the tray out and turn the oven up to 220C/425F/gas 7.

Have the batter ready in a jug. Put about a tablespoon of oil into each dip of a 12-hole muffin tin and put in the oven for two minutes, until the fat is smoking. Turn two of the rings on the hob to medium. Quickly and carefully take the hot muffin tin out of the oven and shut the door. Put the muffin tray on the lit hob and gently fill each hole with batter to about 2cm from the top.

Put the tray back into the oven, shut the door and bake for 12 minutes – do not be tempted to open the door too soon – they will deflate. Check through the oven glass at 12 minutes: if they have risen like little towers and are nicely golden, take them out. If not, leave them in without opening the oven for another few minutes, keeping an eye on them.

Serve the yorkshires with the roasted tomatoes, onions and beans, and, if you like, peas and mashed sweet potato.

Carrot marmalade

Anna Jones’s carrot marmalade.



Anna Jones’s carrot marmalade. Photograph: Anna Jones for the Guardian

This is a classic made by my husband’s Mum, Sian, and I’ve seen something similar in a Mrs Beeton book, too. I love it on crumpets with cheese but it also works just as well next to a dal or curry.

Prep 10 min
Macerate 2 hr
Cook 20 min
Makes 700g

1 tbsp coriander seeds
500g carrots, peeled and grated
1 small thumb fresh ginger, grated
200g caster sugar
Juice and zest of 1 lemon
Juice and zest of 1 orange
2 tbsp runny honey
100ml white wine vinegar
Salt

Bash the coriander seeds in a mortar and tip into a bowl; add the grated carrots, ginger, sugar and zests, and put into the fridge to macerate for at least two hours to draw out the liquid.

When the carrots are done, mix the honey, citrus juices and vinegar with half a teaspoon of salt in a large heavy-based pan, and stir until the salt has dissolved.

Tip in the carrot mixture and slowly bring to a boil, then reduce the heat and simmer for 15 minutes, until the carrots and ginger are tender. Turn the heat up and boil until almost all the liquid has evaporated. You will need to stir it towards the end to make sure it doesn’t stick.

Spoon into warm sterilised jars. It will keep for 18 months but, once opened, store it in the fridge and eat within a month.

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